There’s a feud brewing, as big as Biggie vs. Tupac, or Jay Z vs. Nas and it maybe as big as Domino’s vs. Pizza Hut. D.P. Dough, the college-centric calzone concept known for all sorts of zany trademarks and funny social media has released an album by rapping calzone Stoney Calzone, calling out the pizza industry at large—and the beats are as hot as the oven in the back. 

According to a press release about the five-song album, Stoney was “disappointed in the state of food rap, Stoney immediately began pursuing a career in hip-hop (historically a difficult genre for food). His lyrics are inspired by his extreme dislike of pizza and his hell-bent determination to raise worldwide calzone awareness.”

It’s all very silly, but former CEO Matt Crumpton said that’s the point, it helps differentiate the brand. 

“As a college brand, it helps to be associated with hip-hop music, which is the dominant music genre for our demographic. What better way to differentiate the brand from pizza and other late night concepts?,” said Crumpton. 

Crumpton, who who moved into the general counsel role after it was acquired by a competing calzone company—but that’s another story—said it’s something that has been in the works for a long time passion project from the team. That team just happens to include director of growth, Jerry DePizzo, who moonlights as a multi-platinum musician from the group O.A.R. and Erik Opheim, the VP of marketing at D.P. Dough. 

“Ultimately, the Stoney Calzoney project was possible because D.P. Dough’s marketing department happens to have some incredible musicians on our team who can write and record music for a fraction of the cost that it would take other brands to hire an outside creative firm to do,” said Crumpton. 

Will it “get the industry rattled” as Stoney says in the opening song? Well, probably not, but it’s certainly fun for D.P. Dough’s fans. 

“We don’t expect anyone to go to D.P. Dough just because of Stoney Calzoney. The brand promise is all about delicious fresh baked calzones. But, when you have a song about calzones in your head, D.P. Dough tends to stay top of mind if you are already a calzone lover,” said Crumpton.  

Check out the hot beats below to see why Crumpton says he’s not just a “great rapper for a calzone. He’s just a great rapper to me now.”

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